Video in ELT: Moving from Passive to Active Part 5 – Interacting (Social Asynchronous Webinar)

This is the final instalment of the Social Asynchronous Webinar – Video in ELT: Moving from Passive to Active. If you are interested in watching the previous sections, here are the post:

In this section, we discuss the use of Mozilla Popcorn Maker to remix and edit online videos, photos, and audio with maps, text, and popup items. Here is the video:

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I would love to get your feedback on the content of the seminar as well as the idea of the webinar and how it can be improved in the future. Maybe you think this isn’t the best idea or you think it could be done a lot better. If that is the case, please let me know.

If you just want to watch the full webinar (in five sections), here is the YouTube playlist.

Video in ELT: Moving from Passive to Active Part 4 – Annotating (Social Asynchronous Webinar)

Welcome to part 4 of the Social Asynchronous Webinar (SAW) “Video in ELT: Moving from Passive to Active”. You can find all of the posts on this webinar here (from newest to oldest).

In this section, we are discussing the use of videoANT to annotate videos. Watch the video and feel free to add your comments to the video as well.

SAW part 4

Here are links to some of the things I talked about in the video:

I look forward to hearing from each of you as we wind down this first SAW.

Thank you!

 

Video in ELT: Moving from Passive to Active Part 3 – Screencasting (Social Asynchronous Webinar)

Welcome to part three of the first Social Asynchronous Webinar (SAW). Here is where you can find part one and part two along with my initial idea regarding SAWs.

For this section, the focus was on screencasts in the classroom. Below is the link to the videoANT for part three along with links to some of the things mentioned in the video.

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Mentioned in the video:

My post on screencasting using Quicktime Player on a Mac

My post on giving oral feedback for writing assignments

My post on portable apps including CamStudio

Comment from Laura Adele Soracco on using screencasting

Hello everyone!

This SAW idea is incredible. Really like what’s happening here, Nathan 🙂 At the risk of getting a bit off topic, I just wanted to say, since you’ve mention screencast-o-matic, that I find this program really useful to make screencasts of my feedback to students’ first drafts. I do this as an alternative to written feedback when I know the errors are complicated to explain in writing and I want to make sure students can understand me more easily. The nature of your webinar here is making me realize that I could also ask students to use the program to post replies and go over changes with me.

Also, here is a comment this week from Janet McQueen on two teachers who use video and ICT to enhance learning

Hi Nathan

[H]ere are two video clips I think are relevant. They both come from CORE Education EDTALKS series where New Zealand teachers talk about what they are doing especially in ICT.

The first is Amy Park,Engaging parents in transparent classrooms http://edtalks.org/video/engaging-parents-transparent-classrooms.

Amy is actually from Canada and she discusses engaging parents with their children’s learning through the use of technologies. Amy has found that technologies such as blogging and videoing children’s work provides parents with a window to the classroom and helps them feel more connected and better able to be a partner in the learning process. It can be downloaded from http://vimeo.com/50111283.

The second clip follows on from my comments about knowing why you are using a particular tool that you talked about in this weeks video. It is of Claire Amos who is director of eLearning at Epsom Girls’ Grammar. Claire talks about how the school is using a ‘teaching as inquiry’ cycle to inform the eLearning action plans that will be implemented by professional learning groups in each of the school’s curriculum areas. Claire describes the process the teachers are going through in this initiative. Using teaching as inquiry to guide an eLearning action plan you can view it here http://www.edtalks.org/video/using-teaching-inquiry-guide-elearning-action-plan, or download it from http://vimeo.com/50175025.

I look forward to hearing your thoughts on how you use screencasting and also how you have your students use videos in your classroom.

Video in ELT: Moving from Passive to Active Part 2 – Creation (Social Asynchronous Webinar)

Welcome to part two of the first Social Asynchronous Webinar (SAW). In this section, we look over some of the comments that were given after part one and also recording and sharing videos. Some of the comments were not shared in this section as they are applicable to other upcoming portions of this webinar. For those that commented, thank you so much for your input. I look forward to hearing from all of you on how you have students record and share their videos.

Once again, I am using videoANT for commenting, so feel free to watch and comment. I make a small challenge towards the end of the video and I look forward to seeing (and hearing!) how you do with that. At the bottom of this page, I have included links to all of the things that were mentioned in the video including copies of the comments I referred to.

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Laura Adele Soracco: “Excited to give a try to some of the tools you’ve mentioned. I can imagine students in an online course using VideoANT to give presentations and get feedback/questions from other classmates. This side bar here is great because it connects to a specific part of the talk.”

“As speaking practice homework, I’ve used YouTube for Ss to record a 2 minute response after watching a video (I’ve given a list of options). Ss then share the link with me. The downside is that it’s a T-S activity as I did it in the past, but I think in the future if I did this, I’d ask students to upload the link to a shared place, like a Wiki or something similar.”

Note: Laura also interviewed me in regards to SAWs. You can read it here.

David Harbinson: “First off, I like the idea of SAW and it looks like you’re off to a good start. I very rarely have my Ss create videos in class, this is mainly because we don’t have access to computers for them to do so (and it’s not possible to set for homework because of the context that I teach in). However, a few times in the past, I have had students use their smartphones to create a video. The one problem I have encountered is that they take many short clips but then don’t know how to stitch them together. I wonder if anyone knows of a good app, preferably free, that Ss can download in class and quickly use to stitch video clips together?”

Janet McQueen: “Thanks for sharing and trialing this new medium for learning. I don’t currently teach so I haven’t used these tools with students but I am interested in the topic. I do write about second language teaching and incorporating the use of technology for school teachers in New Zealand. I think the key to any tool is that we know why we are using it. Is it the best tool to meet our teaching objectives? Also to embed it in our planning to ensure that our teaching is authentic, has academic rigor, uses applied learning, allows for student active exploration and for them to have connections with adults. Of course to do that we first need to know the technological possibilities and be a learner ourselves so we can use the technology as well.”

Mentioned in the video:

Vid.me

VideoShow: Video Editor and Maker (Android)

iMovie (paid) and YouTube Capture (free) (iOS)

YouTube webcam recorder

Edmodo

Blogger

WordPress

Google Drive 

Thank you all for participating. I look forward to hearing what you all have to say!

Video in ELT: Moving from Passive to Active Part 1 – Introduction (Social Asynchronous Webinar)

Hello and welcome to the first Social Asynchronous Webinar (SAW)! For those who don’t know what that is, I would suggest you first watch the video below or visit my blog post on it.

This first SAW is on the use of video in the ELT classroom. This first section of the webinar introduces us to idea of knowledge creation and then talks about the tools that will be covered in the following sections. This first video is about 10 minutes long and that is about the length that I feel would be good for each subsequent section. You can find a schedule for the remainder of this SAW at the bottom of the page.

These webinars make use of videoANT to allow people to annotate and comment on videos. When you arrive at the site, it is going to ask for an email or permission to use Google+, Facebook, or Twitter to log in. Feel free to use a completely made up email address since you are not required to verify the address. The only thing is that you will need to remember the email address you used to log in at a later time.

SAW 1 Annotate

Here are the slides I used in the video. Most of the links are clickable and will take you to the tools that are going to be covered in future segments of this webinar.

Video in ELT

Feel free to add your comments to the video, the slides, on Twitter, or on this post. If you would like to share a video, audio, or text file, you can email it to me using the address in the slides, or you can send me a link if you have it hosted somewhere.

Here is a schedule for this SAW:

  • July 10 – First section (Introduction)
  • July 14 – Second section (Creating, hosting, and sharing videos)
  • July 18 – Third section (Screencasting)
  • July 22 – Fourth section (Annotating and commenting on videos)
  • July 28 – Final section (Remixing videos)

Thank you for your time and I look forward to learning along with you!

 

Creating a social asynchronous webinar

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Image courtesy of Mark Sebastian

By now, most people have likely at least heard of the term webinar if not taken part in one. I have had the privilege to have given one and also to have taken part in some. For those who maybe have only have heard of the term before but aren’t sure what they are about, here is a quick overview. A webinar is a short seminar hosted live on the internet where people can watch it streaming anywhere in the world if there is at least half-decent internet access. Also, participants can usually ask questions and participate in polls through the text chat functions. Some webinars even allow for live audio and video based questions, but only when there is a moderator in place that can help things run smoothly. Here is my chart comparing face-to-face seminars to webinars:

Face-to-face

 

Webinar

 

Advantage

 

Location

One location Anywhere with internet access Webinar – Saves time and money not having to travel

Time

One time zone Multiple time zones Face-to-face – Easier to schedule for one time zone.

Speaker

Local or must travel Can be anywhere Webinar – Greater access to a selection of speakers

Audience

Local or must travel Can be anywhere Webinar – Broader audience

Costs

Room and speaker costs Internet access and speaker costs Webinar – Location fees can drive up the price

Participation

Ask questions on the spot and discuss afterward Can send text and sometimes audio questions and discussion during
and after
Face-to-face – Both can make use of technology to engage the audience during and after the seminar, but talking to someone in person can be a slight advantage

Adaptability

Pretty much set as far as structure goes Somewhat more flexible on changing the structure Webinar – Even though both can make changes ‘on the fly’ to meet the needs of those participating, neither are that flexible

Reviewing

Can be recorded and posted for comments and discussion Can be recorded and posted for comments and discussion Webinar – No major difference other than the questions are usually typed up and displayed on the screen during the recording making it easier to see them in the video afterward

Planning

Needs to be planned well in advance Can be set up on a very quickly Webinar – Clear winner here.

Sound

Depends on where you sit in the room Depends on your computer setup Webinar – While technology can be finicky at times, the option of making it as loud or as quiet as you want makes this the clear winner.

For the most part, webinars win out in regards to the advantages, but upon reviewing the chart, you can see there are still some things that could be improved. For me, the biggest disadvantage to both webinars and seminars is the schedule. For both of these, if you want to be a participant in the session, you need to be there when the session is happening. That is fine if you have the time, but I can’t tell you how many times I wanted to take part in a webinar or seminar, but I had a class or meeting or something else on that made it impossible to participate. Yes, I can also watch the seminar later on, but it isn’t the same as being there. There is a reason we like to be at a seminar when it happens. While not exactly the same, it is similar to a live drama production. People attend live productions in the theatre not for the precision of the execution since that is more possible through the ability to retake a scene as in filming, but the value is in being a part of the production and the energy the comes from those in attendance and the actors on stage. This is the same for the live seminar or webinar.

Once you take all of those advantages, disadvantages, and ideas and put them into a pot, what comes out? That is what I’ve been thinking about for some time now and here is what I have come up with. It is still a work in progress and is open to suggestions and changes, so feel free to chime in.

I want to do an asynchronous webinar that adapts to the what the audience needs and possibly even includes the audience as part of the webinar. To make this happen, it will require the use of various pieces of the technology puzzle.

The first piece is something to host the video and allow for in-video comments and discussion. This would make use of short recorded pieces spread out over a period of time to allow others to watch when they can (the asynchronous part). For this, I have chosen VideoANT from the University of Minnesota. It takes hosted video and wraps it with a tool where anyone can pause the video at any section and add a comment which shows up as a list beside the video. Click on those comments and the video starts playing where the comment was added. People can even reply to those comments to add to the discussion. This is a free tool that requires minimal registration to view and comment, although even the registration has a workaround to avoid giving away personal information. More on that later.

The next piece of the puzzle is the video host. For this, I am going to use YouTube to host my video since VideoANT works best with that. It would be possible to have others share their videos through other means, but for now, simplicity rules here.

The last piece of the puzzle is a discussion board and host for all things related to the webinar. It should be a place anyone could add to without needing to register. For this, I ended up going with a WordPress blog since I can set the comments to anyone and this allows for people to share thoughts and ideas with nested comments. Also, it keep all of the material in one place. There may be better tools out there to do this, but for accessibility reasons, I think this will work.

Here is a video I recorded talking about this same thing, but showing how VideoANT could be used. Go to the link, enter in your email address, or a fake one if you like, and press play to watch the video. If you want to add a comment while watching, click on the ‘Add an Annotation’ and the video will pause and you can add a text comment.

videoant

Watch and comment

Thanks for your time. I welcome all comments, suggestions, and criticisms.